Skip to main content
Category

Publication

Personal Data and the Influence Industry in Nigerian Elections

By Publication, Publications

An election officer verifying a voter using the Smart Card Reader. Photo credit: BBC

In Nigeria’s 2015 election, Cambridge Analytica (CA) spread targeted disinformation to suppress opposition votes and allegedly released sensitive medical and financial information about then opposition candidate Muhammadu Buhari. In 2018, the Nigerian government formed a committee to investigate, amongst others, CA’s 2015 activities and promised criminal prosecutions if necessary.

However, two years on, there has been no update from the government committee. Furthermore, beyond a flurry of articles in 2018 that largely regurgitated what international media outlets posted, Nigeria’s media houses have largely left CA’s activities and the government committees promised investigations uncovered.

The lack of attention given to the CA scandal is worrying. If we assume that their notoriety derives in part from how egregious some of their tactics were, it is likely that other actors with morally questionable but less scandalous techniques are operating under the radar in Nigeria. It is therefore urgent that we have an overview of the use of data in Nigerian elections, as the first step to increasing awareness and activism. This report is an attempt to fill this gap. Using the framing introduced in Tactical Tech’s publication, Personal Data, Political Persuasion, this report combines interviews with various actors in the political influence industry and secondary evidence from journalistic sources to map the data-driven campaign techniques used in Nigeria. This mapping focuses on the 2015 and 2019 presidential elections but incorporates examples from earlier
and lower-level elections as needed.

The report then addresses a puzzle that the first section unearths: why does it seem that the formal political consulting industry in Nigeria is so small? To answer this, the report looks at the different actors in the influence industry, focusing on the kinds of political actors that hire them, the kinds of elections they tend to be involved in, and the techniques that they use in serving their clients.

The report finds that the use of data-driven campaigning in Nigerian elections is growing in prominence. Generally, political actors use data and digital technologies to fundraise, test for the resonance of campaign messages, target messages to specific geographic locations, and send out
bulk SMS, audio, and WhatsApp messages.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Liberia's Truth And Reconciliation Commission: Reviving Its Recommendations?

By Publication, Publications

After 14 years of civil war that flouted six peace agreements, Liberians representing the warring parties along with civil society groups,
and political parties signed the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in
Accra, Ghana, on 18 August 2003. The CPA called for the establishment of a truth and reconciliation commission and an inclusive two-year interim national government.

The interim government consisted of members of the Charles Taylor regime, representatives of the two rebel factions – the Movement for Democracy in Liberia (MODEL) and Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy (LURD) – and representatives of civilian opposition and civil society organisations. In keeping with provisions in the 2003 CPA, the transitional government passed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Act in May 2005, which called for the creation of a commission
mainly modelled on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The TRC (also referred to as the commission) began its hearings in January 2008. It faced the arduous task of moving the peace process forward to establish the truth about the civil war by providing a platform to discuss issues of impunity and promote national reconciliation and cohesion.

The Commission Consisted of nine commissioners, five men and four women. Efforts were made to mainstream gender in the work of the commission given women played a significant role during, and were notable victims of, the conflict. The TRC mandate was restricted to events that happened between January 1979 to October 2003.

DOWNLOAD FULL BRIEF HERE

Sustaining Peace: Reflections On Transitional Justice Approaches In West Africa

By Publication, Publications

For several decades, West Africa has faced different and varying degrees of
violent conflict, authoritarian and repressive undemocratic governments.
The region has witnessed civil wars, political conflicts, insurgencies, inter-communal conflicts and the “not so new” trend of violent extremism. Liberia experienced more than 14 years of civil unrest and conflict.

The country had two distinct civil wars from 1989 to 2003. The first war (1989- 1996), generally attributed to the repressive regime of Samuel Doe’s
government and campaign to oust him from power by Charles Taylor’s National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL) were considered as one of Africa’s bloodiest. It claimed the lives of over 250,000 with 1 million displaced and at least 25,000 raped.

Three years after the first civil war in 1996, Liberia was again plunged into another civil war, when a rebel group, Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy (LURD), with the support of the government of neighbouring Guinea, began a military offensive to topple the government of President Charles Taylor.

The conflict in Liberia spilled over the border into neighbouring Sierra Leone. The war in Sierra Leone was also driven by the attempts to overthrow the government of President Joseph Saidu Momoh, oust corrupt politicians, and redistribute the country’s resources of the Revolutionary United Front (RUF).


The RUF supported by Liberian rebel leader Charles Taylor and the NFPL was a small band of well-armed and funded guerrilla rebels, who rushed into villages in the eastern countryside and quickly gained momentum and territory.

DOWNLOAD FULL BRIEF HERE

Local Learning: Ideas For Reducing Farmer-Herder Conflicts In Nigeria

By Event, Publication, Publications

The farmer-herder conflict has mutated and is now manifesting and transforming into other forms of conflicts. In Kaduna and Katsina state, the conflict has mutated into armed banditry involving cattle rustling, destruction or theft of farm crops, kidnapping and armed robbery.

For example, a traditional leader in Batsari Katsina categorically stated that “they were no longer herders in the LGA, most herders have now become bandits and cattle rustlers”

The gravity of the situation is such that the bandits operate freely and openly without checks. In Kaduna State, the farmer-herder conflict heightened between 2012 and 2013 but de-escalated between 2013 and 2019 and re-emerged with an intensity of attacks and heavy casualties in 2020.

The conflict in the state also assumed ethno-religious dimension as there is a thin line between ethnicity and religion on the one hand and ecological niches on the other.

In Benue State, the farmer-herder conflict was a frequent occurrence and there was a spike in the conflict incidences between 2014 and 2019 with the crescendo of escalation in 2018 after the state enacted the Anti Open Grazing Law which made a large number of the herders to emigrate from the state into neighbouring Nasarawa State.

The maxim wa gaa or wa usu (ranch or ruin your cattle) in Tiv language is the new norm in Benue State as attested to by Tiv farmers during a focus group discussion.

The conflict in Nasarawa between the farmers and herders can be attributed to the spillover effect of the conflict in the neighbouring Benue State Since Nasarawa is contiguous with Benue State, many the herders that were forced to leave Benue moved into Nasarawa State.

The migration of herders from Benue to border communities in Nasarawa exerted pressures on existing resources in these communities. It also heightened the conflict between farmers and herders in these communities. Ethnicity is also identified as one of the key conflict dynamics in the state. This is because the Jukun and the Alago groups from Keana have been mentioned consistently by a majority of the respondents as actors flaming the amber of the conflict so that they could have access to more farmlands.

DOWNLOAD REPORT HERE

Tackling COVID-19: The Need for a Nigerian Response

By Publication, Publications

The coronavirus is a human tragedy that is now affecting over a million people around the globe. The World Health Organization ( declared COVID 19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. It indicated with certainty that the coronavirus (SARS CoV 2) will spread to all parts of the world and pointed out that all governments, businesses, and individuals had the ability to change the disease’s trajectory. Current Global Status The pandemic continues to expand more than 209 countries and territories have
reported cases of COVID 19 As of April 14 case growth has accelerated to more than 1 5 million cases. Death 125,623 Recovered 466,948.


Some countries have a handful of cases, others with early community transmission have a few hundred, and those with the uncontrolled, widespread transmission have tens of thousands. Governments all over the world have launched unprecedented public health and economic responses. In Nigeria, as of April 14 the coronavirus has so far infected 373 people, 99 discharged and 11 people have died.

Since Nigeria confirmed its index case on 27 th of February, 2020 several measures have been taken by the federal government targeted at curbing the spread of the virus. These were based on best practices as part of the measures implemented in China, Europe and the US.

A Presidential Task Force on COVID 19 was established on 18 th of March by President Buhari chaired by the secretary to the government of the federation, Mr Boss Mustapha. The task force developed a strategy that has resulted in restrictions on travel to and from 15 high infected countries closure of land, sea and air points of entry and the expansion of the national testing capacity from 500 per day to 1500 per day.

The government also suspended activities at the domestic airports by stopping the movement of commercial flights The government also encouraged inter state restrictions on road or sea transportation by imposing a lockdown for 14 days in Lagos, Abuja and Ogun states.

Consequently, many other state governments adhered to this as a measure to contain the virus spread.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Tackling COVID-19: Finding West Africa's Path

By Publication, Publications

Introduction


The days when COVID-19 was only a distant threat to West African countries are over. It is now evident that the virus is here to stay and
must be addressed with practical responses that take into account the West African settings. Although the infection curve is not exponential, community transmission is beginning to gain ground in the region, with countries such as Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Nigeria, and Senegal at the forefront with the most cases.

The lack of testing capacity in many countries suggests that the
estimated number of cases are most likely understated. Currently,
there are three factors that give the region an advantage in the fight against the novel disease. First, is its youthful population. The average age of Africans is below 20 years, and available data suggests that the risk of serious medical complications and death is
lower among younger people.

Furthermore, warm weather in the region could potentially reduce the spread of the virus, although this fact is remains unproven Lastly, as a result of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, it could analysts have argued that the region has some experience confronting infectious diseases.

While these factors might allow the region to avoid the worst of the pandemic, it also faces grave challenges that could overwhelm these advantages They include high levels of poverty densely packed urban areas and weak health systems and insecurity.


As the number of COVID 19 cases continues to increase, it will become increasingly difficult for the fragile healthcare system and economies of the region to withstand the effects of the pandemic This is because overall healthcare financing in most west African countries is relatively low at an average of US 292 per capita, thus, indicating a major constraint to effective healthcare service delivery.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

The Outlook for Ondo: Votes and Violence

By Publication, Publications

Introduction

On the 10 October 2020 the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) will conduct the sixth governorship election in Ondo State since the restoration of democracy in 1999.

The state, in Nigeria’s south west geo political zone, is currently held by the All Progressive Congress (APC) and is strategic in protecting the APCs political hegemony in the zone Although 17 parties have registered candidates, only three have a chance of winning the APC, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) and the Zenith Labour Party (ZLP).

The defection of the incumbent deputy governor, Agboola Ajayi, from the APC and his subsequent emergence as the governorship candidate of ZLP, raised the stakes in the elections.


This report provides an overview of the political environment leading up to the election Specifically, it analyses the strength of the three major political parties and their candidates by thoroughly examining the history of votes and voting pattern, political alliances, and election related violence
of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP). All the three frontline candidates are lawyers by profession.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Climate Change: Recognising the Impacts on West Africa

By Publication

The United States, one of the major culprits with regards to carbon emissions, had been ill-disposed to climate action even before it pulled
out of the Paris Agreement – a global framework to limit global warming to below 2°C and pursuing efforts to limit it to 1.5°C – in 2019.

The current US administration gets a lot of attention for its public opposition to climate change policy, but ten years after the G20 Summit in Pittsburgh, where the world’s most developed economies pledged to phase out subsidies to fossil fuels, these countries, according to a report by the Overseas Development Institute provided US$27.6 billion in domestic and international public finance, US$15.4 billion in fiscal support, and US$20.9 billion in state-owned enterprise investments to promote coal-fired power
production in 2019.


African countries have been left frustrated by the unwillingness of the G20 countries, who are also the biggest polluters, to cut back on their emissions, says Oxfam Pan-Africa’s Food Security and Climate Change lead Alvin
Munyasia. “The last Conference of Parties (COP) negotiations in Madrid did not end well as there was a lot of frustration over pertinent issues like
carbon markets, climate induced loss and damage and financing for adaptation.

It is also unfortunate that the deliberations watered down the spirit in which the Paris Agreement was achieved and highlighted the division between large polluters, emerging polluters, and the most vulnerable countries”.

Many countries in West Africa are increasingly feeling the impacts of
climate change, even though, according to World Resources Institute CAIT Climate Data Explorer, the regions greenhouse gas emissions in 2014 were 994.70 million metric tonnes: just 2.03% of global emissions.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

COVID-19 EN AFRIQUE DE L’OUEST Réponse et impacts

By Publication, Publications

Au 26 juin, plus de 65 000 cas de Covid-19 ont été enregistrés dans les 15 pays qui composent la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique de
l’Ouest, depuis que la pandémie est signalée pour la première fois dans la région, en provenance de l’Europe, via le Nigeria vers la fin de février.


Cette édition spéciale de West Africa Insight donne la possibilité à un groupe d’experts de partager leurs ré exions sur la manière dont les gouvernements de la région gèrent jusqu’à présent la pandémie et les impacts plus importants qu’elle a eus sur la société dans son
ensemble.


Les ripostes particulières de chaque pays y sont examinées en trois parties. Bintu Mansaray s’interroge sur le niveau de préparation du gouvernement de la Sierra Leone pour répondre à la pandémie malgré l’expérience écente d’Ebola. Elle écrit plutôt sur le rôle essentiel que jouent individuellement les citoyens pour vaincre le virus.


Ramatoulaye Sonko se préoccupe du mauvais bilan de gestion des fonds de l’administration Macky Sall. Aussi s’inquiète-t-elle de la reddition de comptes, de la transparence et du récent assouplissement des restrictions
du con􀃫nement qui pourraient miner/saper les efforts de la riposte sénégalaise de la Covid-19.

TÉLÉCHARGER LE RAPPORT COMPLET ICI

Mali’s 2020 Coup: How did we get here?

By PublicationNo Comments

Mali has been facing a serious socio-political crisis that has threatened to tear the country apart since March when the constitutional court overturned 31 provisional parliamentary election results, many in favour of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita’s (IBKs) party. The overturn exacerbated pre-existing political tension across the country and led citizens to protest.

The main opposition group M5-RFP, the June 5 movement – a Rassemblement des Forces Patriotiques du Mali, a coalition of civil society and other opposition groups have repeatedly called for the resignation of President IBK since the formation in June 2002. They blame Keita for Mali’s chronic corruption, economic instability, and for failing to adequately address the eight-year-long jihadist conflict in the north. A protest led by M5-RFP figurehead Imam Mahmoud Dicko in July, resulted in the death of two people and dozens of injuries as violent clashes broke out between law enforcement officials and protesters, who blocked off streets and attacked the parliament building.

ECOWAS calls for a unity government in Mali

In a bid to solve Mali’s political crisis ECOWAS pressured Keita to agree to a 6-member government that would be tasked with solving the country’s issues. The new government was expected to resolve ongoing tension between the president and M5-RFP. The regional body warned of sanctions to be imposed on those who opposed the resolution. ECOWAS, also called for a partial rerun of the parliamentary election and asked the 31 parliamentary members and the speaker of the national assembly to resign.

However, the regional bloc was unsuccessful in gaining widespread support for this deal, particularly from the opposition group. In fact, the coalition indicated their lack of trust in ECOWAS to resolve the issue and maintained their core demand; that President Keita must step down before they would consider a deal.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

DELTA DILEMMAS: Buhari and Nigeria's South-South Zone

By PublicationNo Comments
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image.png

The oil-rich Niger Delta region has been a policy and political challenge to successive administrations in Nigeria since the 1960s. Between 1999 and 2015 it featured prominently in the policy priorities of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP).

This has not been the case with President Muhammadu Buhari, whose election to office in 2015 was based on an overarching promise of ‘change’,
with a specific focus on tackling insecurity, corruption and youth employment.

There was no clear-cut policy agenda for Nigeria’s Niger Delta region at the beginning of President Buhari’s administration in 2015. But the challenges that made the Niger Delta a policy priority to previous governments
remained much the same as they always had.


The oil industry continued to be the main source of public revenue for the Nigerian government. The development deficits that contribute to
armed militancy and protests by ethnic minorities in the region also persisted.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

WEST AFRICA SPEED NOTE ON ELECTIONS

By Publication, Publications

MALI: THE INSTITUTION OF A NEW CONSTITUTIONAL COURT

Following the recommendation of ECOWAS, a new Constitutional Court has been established to resolve the socio-political crisis that is shaking the country.

The new composition of nine includes three members (Amadou Ousmane Touré, Asser Kamate, and Doucourou Kadidia Traoré) appointed by the Head of State, three members (Maliki Ibrahim, Ba Haoua Toumagnon and Beyla Ba) appointed by the National Assembly and three members (Demba Tall, Mohammed Abdourahamane Maïga and Djénéba Karabenta) appointed by the Magistrate Council.

All nine were sworn in on August 10th before the National Assembly in the presence of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita and former Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, the ECOWAS mediator.

The principal mission of the Court is to resolve the electoral dispute that erupted after the legislative elections of March and April.

DOWNLOAD FULL NOTE HERE

West Africa Speed Notes on Security

By Publication, Publications

Recently in Burkina Faso, the government reported an attack on a cattle market in eastern Burkina Faso by some unidentified gunmen during which about 20 people were killed. Similarly, about 25 people were also killed in an attack on another cattle market in the eastern village of Kompienga in May. These incessant killings raised ethnic and religious tensions in the country.
In the same vein, the murder of 8 people by armed men on motorcycles in the region of Kouré, East of Niamey, capital of Niger has been reported.

As revealed by Agence France-Presse, six were French nationals and confirmed staff members of ACTED a French humanitarian non-governmental organization; while two were Nigeriens, a driver and Khadri – a local guide and the president of the Kouré Giraffe Guides Association.

According to a humanitarian aid worker, they were not tourists but rather expatriates who had gone to explore the region for the day in a vehicle
of the organization, one of the few authorized trips outside the capital.

DOWNLOAD FULL SPEED NOTE HERE

Elections, Democracy and COVID-19 in West Africa

By Publication, Publications

Based on its analysis of elections conducted so far in West Africa during the current pandemic, the Centre for Democracy and Development outlines the following considerations to guide the conduct of elections under the pandemic:

Tissued by national governments, public health authorities, and national task forces on the movement and safety of people should inform the decisions taken by governments and electoral management bodies to either postpone or hold elections. Actors should prioritize conducting the full gamut of electoral activities (voter registration, procurement, political campaigning, and electoral crisis management).

Decision-makers must consider the constitutional significance of elections and the originally scheduled dates by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of holding or postponing an election during the pandemic.

This is important if the legitimacy of the elections is not to be questioned or diminished.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Our Analysis For This Week, July 4, 2020

By Blog, Publication, UncategorizedNo Comments

Economy

Declining demand for oilfield services poses a threat to Nigeria’s oil and gas industry

Global demand for Oilfields Services (OFS) has been on a steady decline, and this has continuously challenged the oil industry in Nigeria. Oil represents over 80% of Nigeria’s exports, 30% of its banking-sector credit, and 50% of overall government revenue.

Due to low prices and the looming COVID-19 pandemic, the economy has been affected, leading to limited and postponed activities towards large oil discoveries within the country. According to the World Bank, the collapse in oil prices accompanied by the COVID-19 pandemic is predicted to plunge the Nigerian economy into acute economic recession, the worst since the 1980s.

Government revenues are expected to fall from an already low 8% of GDP in 2019 to a projected 5% this year due to the decline.

It is estimated that Global demand for oilfield services (OFS), measured in the total value of exploration and production (E&P) company purchases, will drop by 25% because of the downturn caused by COVID-19, leading to low oil prices.

Apart from the Nigeria Liquefied Natural Gas train seven project, no major projects or investments are forthcoming. The demand for oilfield services has declined terribly, oilrigs contracts have been postponed and many contracts cancelled.

DOWNLOAD REPORT HERE

COVID-19 In West Africa: Responses And Impacts

By Publication, Publications

As of 26 June, more than 65,000 cases of Covid-19 have been recorded across the 15 countries which comprise the Economic Community of West African States since the pandemic first arrived in the region from Europe,
through Nigeria in late February.

The outbreak has highlighted the important role individual citizens and the private sector can play in supporting health systems strengthening.

The government must capitalise on this momentum to continue to improve medical facilities, train and compensate health care workers and ensure that needed supplies are readily available.

Four years after winning the fight against Ebola, Sierra Leone has another virus to defeat, but the resilience and perseverance of its citizens should offer hope that it will be able to do so.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Buhari's Corruption Fight: A Five Year Assessment

By Publication, Publications
Image

As President Muhammadu Buhari enters his sixth year in office, fighting corruption remains one of his signature policy issues. Even before his successful 2015 election campaign, the fight against corruption
had long been a core part of President Buhari’s personal narrative and popular appeal. Although it is one of the few policy areas in which he recorded some achievements, President Buhari’s anti-corruption record defies simple characterisation.


On the one hand, President Buhari has elevated the fight against corruption by making it a national policy priority; positioning it alongside economic
development and combating insecurity in his speeches and statements. He has empowered anti-corruption agencies, freeing them up to pursue far-reaching investigations into political and bureaucratic corruption.

Appointing capable practitioners to lead the Economic and Financial
Crimes Commission (EFCC) and the Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Commission (ICPC) has been key in reinvigorating
them. Corruption convictions and asset seizures by these agencies have increased on his watch.

He has also followed through on a few key financial management reforms. The mandatory use of the Treasury Single Account (TSA) being the most
notable.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Unpacking Falsehoods: COVID-19 and responses in Kano State

By Publication, Publications
Image

The escalation in the situation in Kano has come as a shock. Reports of a spike in deaths coincided with the suspension of testing in the state. A Daily Trust report on 21 April suggested that around 150 people had died in
Kano in the five days previous. Allegations that sent shockwaves of panic across Nigerian society and resulted in investigations to determine what was behind the sudden spike in deaths. Explanations claimed that the spike in deaths was the result of severe malaria and typhoid fever and a coronavirus-induced fear of going to hospitals. But there remains an
elephant in the room; these deaths could be victims of the COVID-19 who went untested.


The initial response to the suspension of testing was incoherent. The head of the COVID-19 testing centre in Kano, Nasiru Magaji, said it was closed for routine fumigations. Isa Abubakar, a member of the Kano Task Force on COVID-19, attributed the closure to a shortage of testing kits. Osagie Ehanire, Minister of Health, said it was closed due to some staff being infected with COVID19 as well as a shortage of testing kits. That state actors were not sure when the lab would be reopened was the only uncontested point.

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT HERE

Tackling COVID-19: The need for a Nigerian response

By PublicationNo Comments

The coronavirus is a human tragedy that is now affecting over a million people around the globe. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. It indicated with certainty that the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) will spread to all parts of the world and pointed out that all governments, businesses, and individuals had the ability to change the disease’s trajectory.

Current Global Status:

The pandemic continues to expand; more than 209 countries and territories have reported cases of COVID -19. As of April 14, case growth has accelerated to more than 1.5 million cases – Death: 125,623 – Recovered: 466,948(1). Some countries have a handful of cases, others with early community transmission have a few hundred, and those with uncontrolled, widespread transmission have tens of thousands. Governments all over the world have launched unprecedented public-health and economic responses.

In Nigeria, as at April 14, the coronavirus has so far infected 373 people, 99 discharged and 11 people have died(2)(see map). Since Nigeria confirmed its index case on 27th of February, 2020, several measures have been taken by the federal government targeted at curbing the spread of the virus. These were based on best practices as part of the measures implemented in China, Europe and the US. A Presidential Task Force on COVID-19 was established in 18th of March by President Buhari chaired by the secretary to the government of the federation, Mr Boss Mustapha.

The task force developed a strategy that has resulted in restrictions on travel to and from 15 high infected countries; closure of land, sea and air points of entry and the expansion of the national testing capacity from 500 per day to 1500 per day. The government also suspended activities at the domestic airports by stopping the movement of commercial flights. The government also encouraged inter-state restrictions on-road or sea transportation by imposing a lockdown for 14-days in Lagos, Abuja and Ogun states. Consequently, many other state governments adhered to this as a measure to contain the virus spread.

DOWNLOAD REPORT

LA VOIX DU MÉCONTENTEMENT: Médias, élections et délimitation des mandats constitutionnels

By PublicationNo Comments

Le présent numéro de West Africa Insight est consacré aux prochaines élections au Burkina Faso, en Côte d’Ivoire et en Guinée. On y découvre comment les médias, nouveaux et anciens, continuent de nourrir le débat sur les élections et la démocratie tant au Ghana qu’au Nigeria.

Télécharger la publication ici

Dans cette publication, Eloise Bertrand analyse les prévisions politiques de tous les partis en vue des élections de novembre 2020 au Burkina Faso, tout en mettant en doute la possibilité de tenir des élections sans une amélioration signicative de la sécurité dans le nord et l’est du pays.
Dans une autre partie de l’Afrique occidentale francophone, Gilles Yabi évalue les chances et les démarches en vue d’un troisième mandat pour les présidents Alpha Condé en Guinée et Alassane Ouattara en Côte d’Ivoire voisine.

Au Ghana, Ernest Armah examine pour sa part les répercussions qu’auront la technologie et les réseaux sociaux sur le processus démocratique en préparation des élections de n d’année.


Et enn, dans un autre article, Eromo Egbejule se penche sur la multiplication des tentatives visant à limiter la liberté d’expression au Nigeria, en insistant sur le fait que ce phénomène remonte aux années 1980 et qu’il est nécessaire que les médias se battent pour préserver l’espace des opinions divergentes.